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National Geographic announces 2018 Travel Photographer of the Year Photo contests Press releases 

National Geographic announces 2018 Travel Photographer of the Year

Reiko Takahashi of Japan named contest winner with a spectacular underwater photo of a humpback whale

WASHINGTON – WEBWIRE – Tuesday, July 3, 2018 – A photograph of a humpback whale calf’s tail has earned Reiko Takahashi of Japan the prestigious grand-prize in the 2018 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year contestTakahashi will receive a $10,000 USD prize. Takahashi’s incredible photo was selected by a panel of National Geographic judges from more than 13,000 entries.

Takahashi took her grand prize-winning photo, titled “Mermaid,” off the coast of Japan’s Kumejima Island. The long-time photographer left her office job to pursue her passion for underwater photography and traveled to Kumejima Island on a mission to photograph humpback whales with their young calves.

“It was a special scene for me, to be able to take a photo of the calf, completely relaxed in gentle waters,” said Takahashi. “I really cannot believe it. It was my dream to win. I am honored and it will be the driving force for my future shooting,”

The National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year contest celebrates stunning pictures taken by all levels of photographers around the world. National Geographic is at the center of a community filled with bold and curious people, including the talented photographers who submitted their best photos to the 2018 contest.

The 2018 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year contest recognizes spectacular photos taken within the last two years, with entries in three categories: Nature, People and Cities.

In addition to the grand-prize winner, top photos were selected in each of the three categories. Takahashi’s photo was also chosen as the winner in the Nature category. Hiro Kurashina of Japan took top honors in the Cities category for his photo titled “Another Rainy Day in Nagasaki, Kyushu,” while “Tea Culture” by Alessandra Meniconzi of Switzerland won the People category.

All of the winning and honorable mention photos can be viewed at natgeo.com/travelphotocontest.

This year’s competition was judged by Whitney Johnson, vice president of visual experiences at National Geographic, as well as two National Geographic contributing photographers — ocean and adventure photographer Andy Mann and polar photographer Camille Seaman.

“I was amazed at the quality of images and the sensibility towards subject in all three categories for this competition,” said Seaman. “Looking at hundreds of images choosing the winners was a daunting task. The images that stood out did so based not solely on their technical execution but also a sensitivity for a feeling of the moment and originality.”

About National Geographic Partners LLC

National Geographic Partners LLC (NGP), a joint venture between National Geographic and 21st Century Fox, is committed to bringing the world premium science, adventure and exploration content across an unrivaled portfolio of media assets. NGP combines the global National Geographic television channels (National Geographic Channel, Nat Geo WILD, Nat Geo MUNDO, Nat Geo PEOPLE) with National Geographic’s media and consumer-oriented assets, including National Geographic magazines; National Geographic studios; related digital and social media platforms; books; maps; children’s media; and ancillary activities that include travel, global experiences and events, archival sales, licensing and e-commerce businesses. Furthering knowledge and understanding of our world has been the core purpose of National Geographic for 129 years, and now we are committed to going deeper, pushing boundaries, going further for our consumers … and reaching over 730 million people around the world in 172 countries and 43 languages every month as we do it. NGP returns 27 percent of our proceeds to the nonprofit National Geographic Society to fund work in the areas of science, exploration, conservation and education. For more information visit natgeotv.com or nationalgeographic.com

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